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Origin Stories: Adrian Hon

Zombies, Run! is one of the most enduring fitness apps, with half a million users getting active while engaging in ‘missions’ against the zombie apocalypse. Its co-creator spoke to Steph Eaves about the power of story

Published in Fit Tech 2021 issue 2

What’s your background?
I originally trained as an experimental psychologist and neuroscientist at Cambridge, Oxford and UCSD (University of California San Diego), but I was always interested in games that mixed storytelling with the real world. Shortly after I started a PhD at Oxford, I left to help found Mind Candy in 2004, a games company in the UK, and a few years later I co-founded Six to Start, which specialises in games that combine storytelling and the real world, and which I still run today.

How did your training in neuroscience influence your approach to fitness games?
I think it’s a mistake to take scientific research and try to apply it directly to fitness solutions or gamification – the reality is far messier than the headlines or even scientific papers would have you believe! But it did teach me about the importance of repetition and training and addiction; that while it’s easy for people to fall into bad habits, humans are fundamentally always good at learning and can learn to adopt new behaviours. The problem is that everyone’s different and there’s no one-size-fits-all solution!

What did you envision when you began Six to Start?
We’d hoped to make games and do consulting for big companies like the BBC, Disney and Microsoft, and then use what we’d learned and the money we’d made to make our own games.

We were very successful in the first step and won lots of awards including Best of Show at SXSW, but the market was extremely competitive and it was very hard for a small company like ours to make a profit, so it took much longer than expected for us to get in a position to launch Zombies, Run!

How did the idea for creating immersive fitness games come about?
I’ve always wanted to make games that help people achieve their goals. Since I was a kid, I enjoyed games like Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing and Dance Dance Revolution. It’s a shame there aren’t more, and it’s a shame that most educational or instructional games are so boring or ineffective, so making one for fitness was obvious for me, especially as I started running a lot when I was at university.

You’re best known for Zombies, Run! but what other fitness games have you made?
Zombies, Run! was our first proper fitness game, launching in 2012, which we quickly followed up with Zombies, Run! 5K Training later that year. At the end of 2013, we launched The Walk, then in 2014 we had the Superhero Workout, Step Buy Step: A Pedometer Adventure, and Dungeon Runner: Fitness Quest. Finally, in 2017 we launched Racelink, our white-label running app for charities and non-profits.

Tell us about Zombies, Run! – where did the concept come from?
It came from two places: firstly, I’d always wanted to make a running game for smartphones, and I knew that there was a great opportunity to rely on audio gameplay and storytelling to avoid runners having to look at their phone all the time.

Secondly, our co-creator and lead writer Naomi Alderman had just joined an online running group, and when asked what they wanted to achieve, some said they wanted to lose weight or get fit, and one person said they wanted to survive the zombie apocalypse! I groaned when I heard that, since even in 2011 it felt like zombie media was everywhere, but we realised it was a great premise for a game that was all about running.

Did you work with fitness experts?
We worked with fitness experts to design our Zombies, Run! 5K Training plans, and we always consult fitness literature when we design other training plans and features like zombie chases that mimic high intensity interval training. But I think there’s a danger in relying too much on experts and literature as ultimately we need to make sure this all meshes well with fun gameplay and storytelling and technology.

How have you improved Zombies, Run! over the years?
We’ve added a ton of new content and missions – we have something like 500 missions and workouts now, which would take years for a new player to get through. Most of that is in our main ‘zombies’ storyline but we also have ‘New Adventures’ that are comedy, romance, sci-fi, fantasy, factual, you name it. Then we have features like virtual races, location-based running, leaderboards, milestone emails – we’re adding things every month.

What are the challenges with creating a game like this?
There are so many! Our half a million players have an insatiable demand for new stories and workouts, so our writers are always busy filling those. It’s not just a question of “grr, there are more zombies coming!”, we have to make gripping, thrilling stories that will keep people coming back day after day.

Then we always have new features and devices we need to support, like smartwatches and Apple Healthkit and Siri, which takes time to develop. Finally, all smartphone apps need to be constantly maintained since they’ll otherwise basically stop working within a year or two as new versions of iOS and Android are released.

How long do users stay with the game, on average?
A lot of people just try it once and leave, but most people stay for months if not longer. We’re strong believers in the importance of storytelling and gameplay to keep people engaged and motivated to run on that rainy Sunday morning.

Who are the target audiences for your fitness games?
I know it’s a cliché, but it really is everyone. We try not to design games for a specific audience because we think that a great game can be fun and accessible for everyone.

Do you think online fitness classes, etc, could benefit from incorporating elements of story, adventure and game?
Oh absolutely. We have so many ideas for different kinds of exercises, some of which will make it into Zombies, Run! I know there are some online fitness classes that use elements of role playing but it’s hard being a great storyteller AND a great fitness instructor.

What are you working on at the moment?
We’re 100 per cent focused on Zombies, Run! We want to keep improving the core zombie-centric gameplay and storyline while also experimenting with new kinds of stories and workouts.

Last year we launched a free series of home bodyweight workouts within Zombies, Run! called The Home Front, which was super fun, and I think we’ll do more of that in the future!

What advice would you give the general fitness industry?
Incorporating story and gamification can have a huge impact. Zombies, Run!, Pokemon Go, VR fitness games, Nintendo’s Ring Fit Adventure – these are played by millions of people already!

The general fitness industry has a lot to teach us in terms of how to exercise safely and effectively and how to motivate people on a personal level, but they also have a lot to learn in terms of how to use technology and gaming and storytelling effectively.

What is Zombies, Run!?

Only a few have survived the zombie epidemic. You are a Runner en-route to one of humanity’s last remaining outposts. They need your help to gather supplies, rescue survivors and defend their home.

And you have another mission – one they don’t know about...

How it works

• Walk, jog or run anywhere in the world.

• Hear your mission and music through your headphones.

• If you’re chased by zombies, you’ll have to speed up!

• You’ll automatically collect supplies to build up your base.

Other games by Six to Start
Six to Start developed The Walk with the UK’s NHS
Tell us about 7 Minute Superhero

We were one of the very first apps to automatically detect users’ exercises via a phone or tablet’s front-facing camera combined with machine learning. It was tricky to do and tricky to combine with gameplay and storytelling.

What did you learn from the journey of 7 Minute Superhero?

The whole ‘7 minute workout’ fad was huge at the time and we thought that if we made a better, more advanced, more customisable, more fun version, we’d have a lot of success. It didn’t quite work out that way – I think people actually wanted something simpler and easier to play, ultimately! You live and learn.

Tell us about The Walk

The Walk was created with the NHS and Department of Health. They trusted us to make a compelling game and while we consulted with their health and medical experts and read the scientific literature on walking and motivation, they generally left us alone to get on with it!

What have you learned from developing The Walk and seeing how people use it?

The Walk has been pretty popular and has a great community. It’s clear there’s demand for ways to make day-to-day walking more fun and interesting, but it’s tricky from a game and user experience design perspective to know when to weave the story and gameplay into people’s day. With running, you can have an intensive, all-consuming experience for 30-60 minutes, but people walk throughout the day and we don’t want to annoy people by interrupting them with phone alerts and story clips. I suspect that new technology will make this easier in the future.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
people

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
people

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
people

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
people

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
interview

Mathieu Letombe

At Withings, we’re improving the way both patients and the medical community are able to monitor, identify and understand health levels and issues

Refining augmented reality

London boutique The Refinery has created an avatar-led digital fitness offering called ALFI, which utilises augmented reality (AR) to demonstrate movements. Zoe Bertali, one of the co-founders of the gym, tells us more

Jessica Ennis-Hill: founder of Jennis

Jessica Ennis-Hill is on a mission to close the gender data gap in health research. Her app, Jennis CycleMapping, is designed to help women understand their cycles and how to train during each different phase. Steph Eaves speaks to Ennis-Hill to find out exactly how it works

How usable is your product?

Your fit tech product might be a game changer, solving problems or creating new possibilities for clients, but none of this will matter if it’s not easy and enjoyable to use. Industrial designer Nick Chubb explains why usability is key, and the factors to consider when designing your new product

Put on your red light

Red light therapy promises a variety of benefits, including better recovery, skin rejuvenation and increased energy, but is it all too good to be true? Fit Tech spoke to Bryan Gohl and James Strong of Red Light Rising, and Wes Pfiffner of Joovv to find out more
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With ROX Home, we’re now targeting families who want to work out at home but who are bored with traditional ways of home training

Adrian Hon

Zombies, Run! is one of the most enduring fitness apps, with half a million users getting active while engaging in ‘missions’ against the zombie apocalypse. Its co-creator spoke to Steph Eaves about the power of story

Digital community

Matt Stebbings of SLT Group talks about the creation of their Community Portal, a new platform that aims to help anyone to get active, whether that’s inside or outside of SLT’s facilities

Funxtion: A vital connection

NonStop Gym, Switzerland’s no frills gym chain, has appointed FunXtion to create its member training app

Monitoring mental health

New technology uses advanced machine learning to monitor patients’ mental health between visits to their medical providers
people

Devi Mahadevia

Facebook director of sports and fitness partnerships
With Facebook paid online events, publishers can charge viewers to attend a video livestream on their Facebook pages or a third party video service
people

Andy Etches

Founder and sports director, Rezzil
Rezzil was able to have an injured player learning his new manager's philosophy, positioning and playing style – all from a seated position
interview

Preston Lewis, Black Box VR

Game designers have figured out how to keep people unhealthily addicted to games. If only you could be the hero in a game that levelled up your life
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Get Fit Tech
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features

Origin Stories: Adrian Hon

Zombies, Run! is one of the most enduring fitness apps, with half a million users getting active while engaging in ‘missions’ against the zombie apocalypse. Its co-creator spoke to Steph Eaves about the power of story

Published in Fit Tech 2021 issue 2

What’s your background?
I originally trained as an experimental psychologist and neuroscientist at Cambridge, Oxford and UCSD (University of California San Diego), but I was always interested in games that mixed storytelling with the real world. Shortly after I started a PhD at Oxford, I left to help found Mind Candy in 2004, a games company in the UK, and a few years later I co-founded Six to Start, which specialises in games that combine storytelling and the real world, and which I still run today.

How did your training in neuroscience influence your approach to fitness games?
I think it’s a mistake to take scientific research and try to apply it directly to fitness solutions or gamification – the reality is far messier than the headlines or even scientific papers would have you believe! But it did teach me about the importance of repetition and training and addiction; that while it’s easy for people to fall into bad habits, humans are fundamentally always good at learning and can learn to adopt new behaviours. The problem is that everyone’s different and there’s no one-size-fits-all solution!

What did you envision when you began Six to Start?
We’d hoped to make games and do consulting for big companies like the BBC, Disney and Microsoft, and then use what we’d learned and the money we’d made to make our own games.

We were very successful in the first step and won lots of awards including Best of Show at SXSW, but the market was extremely competitive and it was very hard for a small company like ours to make a profit, so it took much longer than expected for us to get in a position to launch Zombies, Run!

How did the idea for creating immersive fitness games come about?
I’ve always wanted to make games that help people achieve their goals. Since I was a kid, I enjoyed games like Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing and Dance Dance Revolution. It’s a shame there aren’t more, and it’s a shame that most educational or instructional games are so boring or ineffective, so making one for fitness was obvious for me, especially as I started running a lot when I was at university.

You’re best known for Zombies, Run! but what other fitness games have you made?
Zombies, Run! was our first proper fitness game, launching in 2012, which we quickly followed up with Zombies, Run! 5K Training later that year. At the end of 2013, we launched The Walk, then in 2014 we had the Superhero Workout, Step Buy Step: A Pedometer Adventure, and Dungeon Runner: Fitness Quest. Finally, in 2017 we launched Racelink, our white-label running app for charities and non-profits.

Tell us about Zombies, Run! – where did the concept come from?
It came from two places: firstly, I’d always wanted to make a running game for smartphones, and I knew that there was a great opportunity to rely on audio gameplay and storytelling to avoid runners having to look at their phone all the time.

Secondly, our co-creator and lead writer Naomi Alderman had just joined an online running group, and when asked what they wanted to achieve, some said they wanted to lose weight or get fit, and one person said they wanted to survive the zombie apocalypse! I groaned when I heard that, since even in 2011 it felt like zombie media was everywhere, but we realised it was a great premise for a game that was all about running.

Did you work with fitness experts?
We worked with fitness experts to design our Zombies, Run! 5K Training plans, and we always consult fitness literature when we design other training plans and features like zombie chases that mimic high intensity interval training. But I think there’s a danger in relying too much on experts and literature as ultimately we need to make sure this all meshes well with fun gameplay and storytelling and technology.

How have you improved Zombies, Run! over the years?
We’ve added a ton of new content and missions – we have something like 500 missions and workouts now, which would take years for a new player to get through. Most of that is in our main ‘zombies’ storyline but we also have ‘New Adventures’ that are comedy, romance, sci-fi, fantasy, factual, you name it. Then we have features like virtual races, location-based running, leaderboards, milestone emails – we’re adding things every month.

What are the challenges with creating a game like this?
There are so many! Our half a million players have an insatiable demand for new stories and workouts, so our writers are always busy filling those. It’s not just a question of “grr, there are more zombies coming!”, we have to make gripping, thrilling stories that will keep people coming back day after day.

Then we always have new features and devices we need to support, like smartwatches and Apple Healthkit and Siri, which takes time to develop. Finally, all smartphone apps need to be constantly maintained since they’ll otherwise basically stop working within a year or two as new versions of iOS and Android are released.

How long do users stay with the game, on average?
A lot of people just try it once and leave, but most people stay for months if not longer. We’re strong believers in the importance of storytelling and gameplay to keep people engaged and motivated to run on that rainy Sunday morning.

Who are the target audiences for your fitness games?
I know it’s a cliché, but it really is everyone. We try not to design games for a specific audience because we think that a great game can be fun and accessible for everyone.

Do you think online fitness classes, etc, could benefit from incorporating elements of story, adventure and game?
Oh absolutely. We have so many ideas for different kinds of exercises, some of which will make it into Zombies, Run! I know there are some online fitness classes that use elements of role playing but it’s hard being a great storyteller AND a great fitness instructor.

What are you working on at the moment?
We’re 100 per cent focused on Zombies, Run! We want to keep improving the core zombie-centric gameplay and storyline while also experimenting with new kinds of stories and workouts.

Last year we launched a free series of home bodyweight workouts within Zombies, Run! called The Home Front, which was super fun, and I think we’ll do more of that in the future!

What advice would you give the general fitness industry?
Incorporating story and gamification can have a huge impact. Zombies, Run!, Pokemon Go, VR fitness games, Nintendo’s Ring Fit Adventure – these are played by millions of people already!

The general fitness industry has a lot to teach us in terms of how to exercise safely and effectively and how to motivate people on a personal level, but they also have a lot to learn in terms of how to use technology and gaming and storytelling effectively.

What is Zombies, Run!?

Only a few have survived the zombie epidemic. You are a Runner en-route to one of humanity’s last remaining outposts. They need your help to gather supplies, rescue survivors and defend their home.

And you have another mission – one they don’t know about...

How it works

• Walk, jog or run anywhere in the world.

• Hear your mission and music through your headphones.

• If you’re chased by zombies, you’ll have to speed up!

• You’ll automatically collect supplies to build up your base.

Other games by Six to Start
Six to Start developed The Walk with the UK’s NHS
Tell us about 7 Minute Superhero

We were one of the very first apps to automatically detect users’ exercises via a phone or tablet’s front-facing camera combined with machine learning. It was tricky to do and tricky to combine with gameplay and storytelling.

What did you learn from the journey of 7 Minute Superhero?

The whole ‘7 minute workout’ fad was huge at the time and we thought that if we made a better, more advanced, more customisable, more fun version, we’d have a lot of success. It didn’t quite work out that way – I think people actually wanted something simpler and easier to play, ultimately! You live and learn.

Tell us about The Walk

The Walk was created with the NHS and Department of Health. They trusted us to make a compelling game and while we consulted with their health and medical experts and read the scientific literature on walking and motivation, they generally left us alone to get on with it!

What have you learned from developing The Walk and seeing how people use it?

The Walk has been pretty popular and has a great community. It’s clear there’s demand for ways to make day-to-day walking more fun and interesting, but it’s tricky from a game and user experience design perspective to know when to weave the story and gameplay into people’s day. With running, you can have an intensive, all-consuming experience for 30-60 minutes, but people walk throughout the day and we don’t want to annoy people by interrupting them with phone alerts and story clips. I suspect that new technology will make this easier in the future.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
people

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
people

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
people

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
people

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
interview

Mathieu Letombe

At Withings, we’re improving the way both patients and the medical community are able to monitor, identify and understand health levels and issues

Refining augmented reality

London boutique The Refinery has created an avatar-led digital fitness offering called ALFI, which utilises augmented reality (AR) to demonstrate movements. Zoe Bertali, one of the co-founders of the gym, tells us more

Jessica Ennis-Hill: founder of Jennis

Jessica Ennis-Hill is on a mission to close the gender data gap in health research. Her app, Jennis CycleMapping, is designed to help women understand their cycles and how to train during each different phase. Steph Eaves speaks to Ennis-Hill to find out exactly how it works

How usable is your product?

Your fit tech product might be a game changer, solving problems or creating new possibilities for clients, but none of this will matter if it’s not easy and enjoyable to use. Industrial designer Nick Chubb explains why usability is key, and the factors to consider when designing your new product

Put on your red light

Red light therapy promises a variety of benefits, including better recovery, skin rejuvenation and increased energy, but is it all too good to be true? Fit Tech spoke to Bryan Gohl and James Strong of Red Light Rising, and Wes Pfiffner of Joovv to find out more
interview

Kilian Saekel

With ROX Home, we’re now targeting families who want to work out at home but who are bored with traditional ways of home training

Adrian Hon

Zombies, Run! is one of the most enduring fitness apps, with half a million users getting active while engaging in ‘missions’ against the zombie apocalypse. Its co-creator spoke to Steph Eaves about the power of story

Digital community

Matt Stebbings of SLT Group talks about the creation of their Community Portal, a new platform that aims to help anyone to get active, whether that’s inside or outside of SLT’s facilities

Funxtion: A vital connection

NonStop Gym, Switzerland’s no frills gym chain, has appointed FunXtion to create its member training app

Monitoring mental health

New technology uses advanced machine learning to monitor patients’ mental health between visits to their medical providers
people

Devi Mahadevia

Facebook director of sports and fitness partnerships
With Facebook paid online events, publishers can charge viewers to attend a video livestream on their Facebook pages or a third party video service
people

Andy Etches

Founder and sports director, Rezzil
Rezzil was able to have an injured player learning his new manager's philosophy, positioning and playing style – all from a seated position
interview

Preston Lewis, Black Box VR

Game designers have figured out how to keep people unhealthily addicted to games. If only you could be the hero in a game that levelled up your life
More features
Technogym
Technogym