GET FIT TECH
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of Fit Tech magazine and also get the Fit Tech ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Get Fit Tech
digital magazine
features

Opinion: Fighting COVID-19

In the aftermath of the pandemic, people will be more aware of the importance of their health and the strength of their immune system. Can fit tech alert users to potential immunodeficiencies or symptoms? And might these products assist governments? We asked industry leaders for their predictions

Published in Fit Tech 2020 issue 2

Tom Fowler, US president, Polar

The adoption of wearables to monitor health status was increasing pre-COVID-19 and the pandemic has been a massive catalyst for a greater shift in this direction.

Polar has seen this reflected in the volume of sales of devices and – importantly – in the data our users have been activating.

We’ve worked for years with pro athletes, coaches and scientists in the area of rest and recovery. This work has focused on optimising athletic performance.

It turns out that the data sets for these elite performers are identical to the data sets that can benefit the general consumer in terms of health maintenance.

Here’s an example of what is possible today with Polar devices. While you sleep, your device can monitor your resting heart rate (HR), heart rate variation (HRV) and respiration rate. You can compare each night’s numbers to your normal baseline. Is your HR lower or higher than normal? How about your HRV and respiration rate?

If you experience four or five days of truly bad numbers, this will be a strong indication that something is amiss. Perhaps it’s just a super-charged work schedule, too much caffeine and alcohol, or too much travelling. Or perhaps the root cause is that you’re incubating an illness that has yet to emerge. Either way, you can see that you need to take extra care of yourself.

At the government level, this is a key opportunity for controlling future pandemics.

I’m strongly optimistic that wearables are increasingly going to be key tools in health, wellness and disease management

If large populations self-monitored and the system flagged deteriorating individuals before they became symptomatic, infected individuals could be tested, receive care and be quarantined before they unwittingly spread the contagion. Similarly, for frontline health workers, early identification of asymptomatic personnel could get them out of the rotation and into care early. This is exactly what Elysian Labs is doing, in partnership with Polar, for the US Army.

Today, we can measure HR, HRV, respiration rate, blood oxygenation and core temperature from commonly available devices. Add blood pressure to that mix and you have a powerful suite of biometrics. The data piece is relatively easy. The big question is how to properly interpret that data. What does a given data set mean for a single individual? How specific and bespoke can that guidance be?

Time will tell of course, but I’m strongly optimistic that wearables are increasingly going to be key tools in health, wellness and disease management.

Mathieu Letombe, CEO, Withings

With the current pandemic causing doctors’ offices to limit patient visits, many people have turned to at-home technologies to monitor their health levels remotely. This transition has highlighted the valuable capabilities and potential of connected home devices, including wearable activity trackers.

Using a range of devices, people can monitor their health, sleep and activity levels anywhere. This includes tracking valuable insights like heart rate monitoring, and atrial fibrillation (AFib) detection.

The ability to monitor a range of health levels daily through wearables allows people and their physicians to better understand their overall health and be able to identify major issues early. Additionally, monitoring people’s health levels from day to night also provides valuable insights into health trends and potential issues, which can be used by medical institutions, providers and other health organisations to create long-term solutions.

We’re looking forward to bringing our next wearable device to market – Scanwatch – which brings medical-grade AFib and sleep apnoea detection capabilities to the wrist

As we continue our efforts in helping people to monitor their health, we’re looking forward to bringing our next wearable device, ScanWatch, to market. ScanWatch brings medical-grade AFib and sleep apnoea detection capabilities to the wrist. The sleep apnoea tracking capabilities are possible through a blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) sensor, which can also be useful for monitoring other issues outside of sleep apnoea.

Eddie Fletcher, Lead sport scientist, Wattbike

Utilising the right fitness technology, which can accurately test, benchmark and track key performance indicators, can result in a marked improvement in health and fitness, improving a person’s ability to prevent complications from illness.

The Cardiorespiratory Fitness test (CRF), which is built into the Wattbike, is a measure of VO2max, used to record current health and fitness benchmarks.

From this score, personalised, effective training plans can be assigned that will improve CRF scores, and – in turn – overall health. As CRF scores improve, training plans become more advanced, ensuring there’s continual progression.

This test is designed to both identify current health concerns and potential risks, with tailored lifestyle coaching to help users improve their health for the long-term.

There’s huge scope for how the CRF test can help individuals, governments and the medical profession in the fight against obesity, which is one of the biggest risk factors for dying of COVID-19.

Discovery Vitality developed a health assessment programme in partnership with Wattbike that was delivered across over 450 different venues in South Africa and last year, approximately 100k assessments were completed.

Our test is designed to both identify current health concerns and potential future risks

Governments need to be rallied and key decision makers need to act on the facts. Most importantly, it’s people in sedentary populations who need to be targeted and engaged in order to encourage them to benchmark, track and improve their health.

Technology will continue to drive rapid advancements in health monitoring. Health tracking will just become a part of every day, reaching outside the four walls of a gym facility.

Wattbike’s CRF test comes with tailored lifestyle coaching
Will Ahmed, CEO, Whoop

We believe Whoop has the potential to predict illness and demonstrate secrets your body is trying to tell you that you otherwise can’t feel.

This is going to become more important in society as we come to terms with the fact that a virus can keep everyone indoors or make people sick, and that you could be asymptomatic and not know you have it.

We feel it’s our responsibility to examine these areas, because we can measure things in your body that you can’t feel, and illness is a huge component of that.

When thinking about something like our current medical system and how we’ve treated doctors’ appointments, we’ve found the snapshots of your body that the GP gets are only as useful as photos. They give you a glimpse into a moment in time, but they don’t tell the complete story.

The snapshots of your body that the GP gets are only as useful as photos. They give you a glimpse of a moment in time, but they don’t tell the complete story

If you’re trying to understand if someone is sick or has an underlying issue, you need continuous data and that’s where doctors should – and inevitably will – use data from wearables to help patients.

In this way, technology can play a big role in helping society, government and employers to manage their populations in an empowering way.

Whoop also helps people understand their own bodies and that, in turn, can make them more self-aware and healthier.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
More features
people

Andy Etches

Founder and sports director, Rezzil
Rezzil was able to have an injured player learning his new manager's philosophy, positioning and playing style – all from a seated position

Fit Tech Leadership Report

Fit tech is a growing, competitive sector. Executive search firm, Stronger Talent, recently analysed the backgrounds of more than 300 fit tech executives to provide insights into recruiting strategies, as Pete Leibman explains

Staying sticky

Bob Lawson explains how digital fitness platforms and apps can maximise retention and prevent churn
people

Kevin Dawidowicz

President, CoachMePlus
Fitness apps are designed to train clients, without a trainer on the other side. We give coaches a tool for connection
interview

Blurring the lines

Les Mills has launched a suite of digital solutions to help gyms future-proof by expanding their reach in the booming online fitness space, while complementing their live offerings. Steph Eaves talks to Les Mills International’s CMO Anna Henwood to find out more

Funxtion: A brand new app

FunXtion and GoodLife Fitness are collaborating to help Canadians stay fit in the gym and at home
people

Devi Mahadevia

Facebook director of sports and fitness partnerships
With Facebook paid online events, publishers can charge viewers to attend a video livestream on their Facebook pages or a third party video service

Collect wind power as you move

Researchers in China have designed a tiny device that can scavenge wind energy from the breeze you make when you walk or run

Virtual wellbeing check

Feelings of pressure, isolation and performance anxiety are commonly experienced by athletes, however it isn’t always easy for clubs to identify those who are struggling. Richard Lucas, founder of GoVox, explains how technology can help

Clubs without walls

Venueserve Fitness is working with the Health Club Collection to drive its digital customer engagement
Editor's letter

Big (fit) tech

We’re entering the age of the wellness mega-corp, with the ultimate goal for investors being to dominate health and wellness markets in every channel. Prepare to expect the unexpected in this convergence of health, fitness and wellness

Digital retention top performers

Three digital fitness platforms tell Fit Tech how they work to achieve higher levels of customer retention
interview

Robotic muscles

We identified the need to step beyond the current approaches to muscle weakness, and move instead to placing robotic muscles exactly where they’re needed – inside the body
interview

Rodrigo Jesus, Salus Optima

The result is a powerful, holistic data-driven, outcome-focused, highly personalised application that helps people to achieve their goals and deal with the natural day-to-day problems
interview

Preston Lewis, Black Box VR

Game designers have figured out how to keep people unhealthily addicted to games. If only you could be the hero in a game that levelled up your life

Sky x Fiit

Fiit has secured a deal with TV giant Sky, to make its virtual workout platform available through the subscription-based Sky Q service. With 20 per cent of Fiit users now accessing the app through Sky, Fit Tech speaks to Fraser Stirling and Daniel Shellard to find out more
interview

Daniel Sobhani, Freeletics

People are set up for failure by the fitness industry with false promises and unrealistic expectations. We’ve always wanted to put a stop to this, and with Mindset Coaching we’re taking the next step

Functional wearables

A new ultra-thin, stretchable electronic material could be a game changer for wearable tech
people

Richard Hanbury

Founder and CEO, Sana
I was in Yemen, close to the capital, Sana’a, when I had the accident that put me in a wheelchair and gave me a chronic nerve damage pain problem. This led me to develop the underlying technology of Sana
interview

Sharon Hegarty, Samsung

We’ve worked with ecosystem partners, such as Calm and Fitplan, to bring their expertise to our devices
interview

Digital ecosystem

The digitisation of the sector was going to happen anyway. COVID-19 has simply accelerated the digital transformation
interview

Will Ahmed, Whoop

Whoop is taking wearable technology to the next level, providing deeper insights into individuals’ physiology and enabling optimised training. Founder and CEO Will Ahmed talks to Steph Eaves about the importance of personalised feedback

Create your own energy

A breakthrough in technology means wearable devices and other health and fitness products could soon be self-powered. Steph Eaves talks to Dr Ishara Dharmasena to find out how this could impact health and fitness

Fighting COVID-19

In the aftermath of the pandemic, people will be more aware of the importance of their health and the strength of their immune system. Can fit tech alert users to potential immunodeficiencies or symptoms? And might these products assist governments? We asked industry leaders for their predictions
Featured supplier: Precor launches member-focused Preva Mobile app
Precor has launched a mobile app to accompany its popular networked fitness solution, Preva, which has so far recorded almost a billion workouts in more than 11,000 facilities worldwide.
Featured supplier: What does a socially distanced leisure centre and health club look like?
The world has had to get used to social distancing in 2020 and any business operating in the leisure and hospitality sectors has had to face this challenge more than most.
Excite Live Experience: Join the party with Technogym
Technogym
The new Excite line makes training more fun and inspiring for any age or fitness level with lots of workouts and entertainment options. Read more
Company profile: Gympass
On a mission to defeat inactivity, Gympass is a corporate wellness solution that builds mutually ...
Company profile: fibodo Limited
fibodo is the digital solution helping people lead healthier and happier lives. From grassroots individual ...
Exercise equipment
Matrix Fitness: Exercise equipment
Spa software
ResortSuite: Spa software
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Featured supplier: Precor launches member-focused Preva Mobile app
Precor has launched a mobile app to accompany its popular networked fitness solution, Preva, which has so far recorded almost a billion workouts in more than 11,000 facilities worldwide.
Featured supplier: What does a socially distanced leisure centre and health club look like?
The world has had to get used to social distancing in 2020 and any business operating in the leisure and hospitality sectors has had to face this challenge more than most.
Company profile: Gympass
On a mission to defeat inactivity, Gympass is a corporate wellness solution that builds mutually ...
Company profile: fibodo Limited
fibodo is the digital solution helping people lead healthier and happier lives. From grassroots individual ...
Excite Live Experience: Join the party with Technogym
Technogym
The new Excite line makes training more fun and inspiring for any age or fitness level with lots of workouts and entertainment options. Read more
Get Fit Tech
Sign up for the free digital edition of Fit Tech magazine and the free weekly Fit Tech ezine
Sign up
Exercise equipment
Matrix Fitness: Exercise equipment
Spa software
ResortSuite: Spa software
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions

latest news

A new at-home fitness app will enable friends, communities, and coaches to remotely work out together using live video links. ...
Fitness tech firm Therabody has expanded into a new area of wellness with the launch of a new compression recovery ...
Les Mills has come up with an ingenious solution to get around the pandemic travel bans, which threatened a long ...
At-home fitness giant Peloton has officially completed the acquisition of equipment provider Precor, in a deal worth US$420m. Precor will ...
A new digital fitness platform has combined a digital exercise offering with online dating features which allow users to meet ...
Sport:80, a developer of cloud-based sport management software, has launched a club management system to help governing bodies and grassroots ...
Fitness tech startup Motosumo has secured a Series A funding round, which it will use to expand and develop its ...
Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex has become the first chief impact officer of US-based coaching and mental health firm ...
Myzone CEO, Dave Wright, has announced the launch of MZ-Switch, a mobile heart rate monitor which can now sit on ...
A three-year-old-boy has died of the injuries he sustained in an accident involving a Peloton Tread+ running machine. No details ...
Fitness tech and software firm Exerp has secured a strategic partnership agreement with budget gym chain PureGym. The deal will ...
A new report shows how the pandemic is shifting consumer behaviours in fitness, sport and physical activity – and how ...
More news
features

Opinion: Fighting COVID-19

In the aftermath of the pandemic, people will be more aware of the importance of their health and the strength of their immune system. Can fit tech alert users to potential immunodeficiencies or symptoms? And might these products assist governments? We asked industry leaders for their predictions

Published in Fit Tech 2020 issue 2

Tom Fowler, US president, Polar

The adoption of wearables to monitor health status was increasing pre-COVID-19 and the pandemic has been a massive catalyst for a greater shift in this direction.

Polar has seen this reflected in the volume of sales of devices and – importantly – in the data our users have been activating.

We’ve worked for years with pro athletes, coaches and scientists in the area of rest and recovery. This work has focused on optimising athletic performance.

It turns out that the data sets for these elite performers are identical to the data sets that can benefit the general consumer in terms of health maintenance.

Here’s an example of what is possible today with Polar devices. While you sleep, your device can monitor your resting heart rate (HR), heart rate variation (HRV) and respiration rate. You can compare each night’s numbers to your normal baseline. Is your HR lower or higher than normal? How about your HRV and respiration rate?

If you experience four or five days of truly bad numbers, this will be a strong indication that something is amiss. Perhaps it’s just a super-charged work schedule, too much caffeine and alcohol, or too much travelling. Or perhaps the root cause is that you’re incubating an illness that has yet to emerge. Either way, you can see that you need to take extra care of yourself.

At the government level, this is a key opportunity for controlling future pandemics.

I’m strongly optimistic that wearables are increasingly going to be key tools in health, wellness and disease management

If large populations self-monitored and the system flagged deteriorating individuals before they became symptomatic, infected individuals could be tested, receive care and be quarantined before they unwittingly spread the contagion. Similarly, for frontline health workers, early identification of asymptomatic personnel could get them out of the rotation and into care early. This is exactly what Elysian Labs is doing, in partnership with Polar, for the US Army.

Today, we can measure HR, HRV, respiration rate, blood oxygenation and core temperature from commonly available devices. Add blood pressure to that mix and you have a powerful suite of biometrics. The data piece is relatively easy. The big question is how to properly interpret that data. What does a given data set mean for a single individual? How specific and bespoke can that guidance be?

Time will tell of course, but I’m strongly optimistic that wearables are increasingly going to be key tools in health, wellness and disease management.

Mathieu Letombe, CEO, Withings

With the current pandemic causing doctors’ offices to limit patient visits, many people have turned to at-home technologies to monitor their health levels remotely. This transition has highlighted the valuable capabilities and potential of connected home devices, including wearable activity trackers.

Using a range of devices, people can monitor their health, sleep and activity levels anywhere. This includes tracking valuable insights like heart rate monitoring, and atrial fibrillation (AFib) detection.

The ability to monitor a range of health levels daily through wearables allows people and their physicians to better understand their overall health and be able to identify major issues early. Additionally, monitoring people’s health levels from day to night also provides valuable insights into health trends and potential issues, which can be used by medical institutions, providers and other health organisations to create long-term solutions.

We’re looking forward to bringing our next wearable device to market – Scanwatch – which brings medical-grade AFib and sleep apnoea detection capabilities to the wrist

As we continue our efforts in helping people to monitor their health, we’re looking forward to bringing our next wearable device, ScanWatch, to market. ScanWatch brings medical-grade AFib and sleep apnoea detection capabilities to the wrist. The sleep apnoea tracking capabilities are possible through a blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) sensor, which can also be useful for monitoring other issues outside of sleep apnoea.

Eddie Fletcher, Lead sport scientist, Wattbike

Utilising the right fitness technology, which can accurately test, benchmark and track key performance indicators, can result in a marked improvement in health and fitness, improving a person’s ability to prevent complications from illness.

The Cardiorespiratory Fitness test (CRF), which is built into the Wattbike, is a measure of VO2max, used to record current health and fitness benchmarks.

From this score, personalised, effective training plans can be assigned that will improve CRF scores, and – in turn – overall health. As CRF scores improve, training plans become more advanced, ensuring there’s continual progression.

This test is designed to both identify current health concerns and potential risks, with tailored lifestyle coaching to help users improve their health for the long-term.

There’s huge scope for how the CRF test can help individuals, governments and the medical profession in the fight against obesity, which is one of the biggest risk factors for dying of COVID-19.

Discovery Vitality developed a health assessment programme in partnership with Wattbike that was delivered across over 450 different venues in South Africa and last year, approximately 100k assessments were completed.

Our test is designed to both identify current health concerns and potential future risks

Governments need to be rallied and key decision makers need to act on the facts. Most importantly, it’s people in sedentary populations who need to be targeted and engaged in order to encourage them to benchmark, track and improve their health.

Technology will continue to drive rapid advancements in health monitoring. Health tracking will just become a part of every day, reaching outside the four walls of a gym facility.

Wattbike’s CRF test comes with tailored lifestyle coaching
Will Ahmed, CEO, Whoop

We believe Whoop has the potential to predict illness and demonstrate secrets your body is trying to tell you that you otherwise can’t feel.

This is going to become more important in society as we come to terms with the fact that a virus can keep everyone indoors or make people sick, and that you could be asymptomatic and not know you have it.

We feel it’s our responsibility to examine these areas, because we can measure things in your body that you can’t feel, and illness is a huge component of that.

When thinking about something like our current medical system and how we’ve treated doctors’ appointments, we’ve found the snapshots of your body that the GP gets are only as useful as photos. They give you a glimpse into a moment in time, but they don’t tell the complete story.

The snapshots of your body that the GP gets are only as useful as photos. They give you a glimpse of a moment in time, but they don’t tell the complete story

If you’re trying to understand if someone is sick or has an underlying issue, you need continuous data and that’s where doctors should – and inevitably will – use data from wearables to help patients.

In this way, technology can play a big role in helping society, government and employers to manage their populations in an empowering way.

Whoop also helps people understand their own bodies and that, in turn, can make them more self-aware and healthier.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
More features
people

Andy Etches

Founder and sports director, Rezzil
Rezzil was able to have an injured player learning his new manager's philosophy, positioning and playing style – all from a seated position

Fit Tech Leadership Report

Fit tech is a growing, competitive sector. Executive search firm, Stronger Talent, recently analysed the backgrounds of more than 300 fit tech executives to provide insights into recruiting strategies, as Pete Leibman explains

Staying sticky

Bob Lawson explains how digital fitness platforms and apps can maximise retention and prevent churn
people

Kevin Dawidowicz

President, CoachMePlus
Fitness apps are designed to train clients, without a trainer on the other side. We give coaches a tool for connection
interview

Blurring the lines

Les Mills has launched a suite of digital solutions to help gyms future-proof by expanding their reach in the booming online fitness space, while complementing their live offerings. Steph Eaves talks to Les Mills International’s CMO Anna Henwood to find out more

Funxtion: A brand new app

FunXtion and GoodLife Fitness are collaborating to help Canadians stay fit in the gym and at home
people

Devi Mahadevia

Facebook director of sports and fitness partnerships
With Facebook paid online events, publishers can charge viewers to attend a video livestream on their Facebook pages or a third party video service

Collect wind power as you move

Researchers in China have designed a tiny device that can scavenge wind energy from the breeze you make when you walk or run

Virtual wellbeing check

Feelings of pressure, isolation and performance anxiety are commonly experienced by athletes, however it isn’t always easy for clubs to identify those who are struggling. Richard Lucas, founder of GoVox, explains how technology can help

Clubs without walls

Venueserve Fitness is working with the Health Club Collection to drive its digital customer engagement
Editor's letter

Big (fit) tech

We’re entering the age of the wellness mega-corp, with the ultimate goal for investors being to dominate health and wellness markets in every channel. Prepare to expect the unexpected in this convergence of health, fitness and wellness

Digital retention top performers

Three digital fitness platforms tell Fit Tech how they work to achieve higher levels of customer retention
Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces