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features

Editor's letter: Reverse globalisation

The making and shipping of products long distances is contributing to earth death. Now the EU is introducing import/ export laws to force companies to localise their supply chains

Published in Health Club Management 2023 issue 8

Import-export legislation isn’t the most sexy topic and for those focused on their own businesses and lives, the majority of changes to these kinds of legal frameworks are likely to go unnoticed.

However, the EU has been working hard on a new law that takes effect from next month (October 2023) and that will change the shape of supply, with implications for operators and suppliers (see page 44).

Called the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism – or CBAM for short – it’s all part of the EU’s ambition to make Europe the first climate neutral continent by 2050.

Parts of this goal are to be realised by ‘disincentivising’ the import of goods and materials from countries with lax environmental standards, or where shipping long distances causes harm to the planet.

The EU’s view is that it isn’t OK for Europe to hit its eco targets while still importing from countries which are pumping out carbon. Neither is it OK to be shipping things around the world that could be made locally, so CBAM is basically a push for reverse globalisation.

To deliver on this goal, carbon taxes will be payable by all companies importing into the EU and the greater distance goods and materials have to travel, the more tax will be due.

Although the UK is no longer technically part of the EU, it’s thought it will align with this new process.

The timeline for the introduction of CBAM will see the final tranche of legislation coming into effect in January 2026 – in only 15 months time – so the rollout of the law will be rapid, forcing companies to adapt.

The new tax landscape will mainly hit the makers and importers of fitness equipment and other kit for health clubs, however, in a facility-based market this in turn will impact operators, meaning we’ll see some disruption in the supply side of the industry where companies have not been aware of or preparing for CBAM.

There will also be work to be done reversing current practices where supply chains were set-up in non-EU countries with less ambitious environmental policies to avoid the EU Emission Trading System.

Because CBAM will favour companies that manufacture within the EU, it’s likely we’ll see some movement in the sales rankings of major suppliers and perhaps a flurry of M&A activity.

We also expect discussions to be held around contracts where operators have committed to longer terms with suppliers who will have to raise prices.

Ultimately, this is the reality of the climate crisis and if we don’t adapt, we won’t have a planet to live on, so the industry needs to move fast and with energy and purpose to accommodate this new reality.

Liz Terry, editor [email protected]

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
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features

Editor's letter: Reverse globalisation

The making and shipping of products long distances is contributing to earth death. Now the EU is introducing import/ export laws to force companies to localise their supply chains

Published in Health Club Management 2023 issue 8

Import-export legislation isn’t the most sexy topic and for those focused on their own businesses and lives, the majority of changes to these kinds of legal frameworks are likely to go unnoticed.

However, the EU has been working hard on a new law that takes effect from next month (October 2023) and that will change the shape of supply, with implications for operators and suppliers (see page 44).

Called the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism – or CBAM for short – it’s all part of the EU’s ambition to make Europe the first climate neutral continent by 2050.

Parts of this goal are to be realised by ‘disincentivising’ the import of goods and materials from countries with lax environmental standards, or where shipping long distances causes harm to the planet.

The EU’s view is that it isn’t OK for Europe to hit its eco targets while still importing from countries which are pumping out carbon. Neither is it OK to be shipping things around the world that could be made locally, so CBAM is basically a push for reverse globalisation.

To deliver on this goal, carbon taxes will be payable by all companies importing into the EU and the greater distance goods and materials have to travel, the more tax will be due.

Although the UK is no longer technically part of the EU, it’s thought it will align with this new process.

The timeline for the introduction of CBAM will see the final tranche of legislation coming into effect in January 2026 – in only 15 months time – so the rollout of the law will be rapid, forcing companies to adapt.

The new tax landscape will mainly hit the makers and importers of fitness equipment and other kit for health clubs, however, in a facility-based market this in turn will impact operators, meaning we’ll see some disruption in the supply side of the industry where companies have not been aware of or preparing for CBAM.

There will also be work to be done reversing current practices where supply chains were set-up in non-EU countries with less ambitious environmental policies to avoid the EU Emission Trading System.

Because CBAM will favour companies that manufacture within the EU, it’s likely we’ll see some movement in the sales rankings of major suppliers and perhaps a flurry of M&A activity.

We also expect discussions to be held around contracts where operators have committed to longer terms with suppliers who will have to raise prices.

Ultimately, this is the reality of the climate crisis and if we don’t adapt, we won’t have a planet to live on, so the industry needs to move fast and with energy and purpose to accommodate this new reality.

Liz Terry, editor [email protected]

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
More features
Editor's letter

Into the fitaverse

Fitness is already among the top three markets in the metaverse, with new technology and partnerships driving real growth and consumer engagement that looks likely to spill over into health clubs, gyms and studios
Fit Tech people

Ali Jawad

Paralympic powerlifter and founder, Accessercise
Users can easily identify which facilities in the UK are accessible to the disabled community
Fit Tech people

Hannes Sjöblad

MD, DSruptive
We want to give our users an implantable tool that allows them to collect their health data at any time and in any setting
Fit Tech people

Jamie Buck

Co-founder, Active in Time
We created a solution called AiT Voice, which turns digital data into a spoken audio timetable that connects to phone systems
Profile

Fahad Alhagbani: reinventing fitness

Alexa can help you book classes, check trainers’ bios and schedules, find out opening times, and a host of other information
Opinion

Building on the blockchain

For small sports teams looking to compete with giants, blockchain can be a secret weapon explains Lars Rensing, CEO of Protokol
Innovation

Bold move

Our results showed a greater than 60 per cent reduction in falls for individuals who actively participated in Bold’s programme
App analysis

Check your form

Sency’s motion analysis technology is allowing users to check their technique as they exercise. Co-founder and CEO Gal Rotman explains how
Profile

New reality

Sam Cole, CEO of FitXR, talks to Fit Tech about taking digital workouts to the next level, with an immersive, virtual reality fitness club
Profile

Sohail Rashid

My vision was to create a platform that could improve the sport for lifters at all levels and attract more people, similar to how Strava, Peloton and Zwift have in other sports
Ageing

Reverse Ageing

Many apps help people track their health, but Humanity founders Peter Ward and Michael Geer have put the focus on ageing, to help users to see the direct repercussions of their habits. They talk to Steph Eaves
App analysis

Going hybrid

Workout Anytime created its app in partnership with Virtuagym. Workout Anytime’s Greg Maurer and Virtuagym’s Hugo Braam explain the process behind its creation
Research

Physical activity monitors boost activity levels

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have conducted a meta analysis of all relevant research and found that the body of evidence shows an impact
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
Fit Tech People

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
Fit Tech People

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
Fit Tech People

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
Fit Tech People

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
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