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Technogym | Fit Tech promotion
Technogym | Fit Tech promotion
Technogym | Fit Tech promotion
features

Promotional feature: Cybex

High intensity training evolved

Published in Health Club Management 2015 issue 9

Cross trainers are a staple feature in every gym’s cardio section; but ever since the launch of the Arc Trainer, premium fitness equipment supplier Cybex has been offering a unique training option for the fitness industry.

And now there’s something new; launching in the UK this September, the SPARC Trainer combines the innovative features of the Arc Trainer with fan-based resistance providing immediate resistance with no power requirements. The intuitive ‘get on and go’ design invites users to simply choose their incline while their speed determines their intensity to deliver the most powerful and effective resisted cardio workout users will get from any cross trainer.

Based on the best
Modelled on Cybex’s Arc Trainer, SPARC incorporates the design features that makes the Arc so iconic; its unique patented Reverse Arc Motion places less stress on the user’s knees and is scientifically proven to be gentler on joints, explains Dr. Paul Juris, executive director of the Cybex Research Institute: “Unlike other cross trainers, the Arc pattern of motion allows the hip and knee to move synchronously while the foot stays under the knee - so when the user pushes down and back, the opposite footplate is already up and in position, severely reducing the load and stress levels placed on key joints.”

Its activation of the glutes, quads and hamstrings – as a direct consequent of the biomechanical design of the Arc Motion – means users can work at a higher intensity, resulting in a higher level of calorie burn.

Also integral to the design of SPARC – and another feature that has been adopted from the Arc Trainer - is its ability to provide a multi-faceted workout: “SPARC doesn’t just train for cardio and weight loss; users can really boost metabolism, build muscle and gain power by moving faster against the fan resistance to generate over 1200 watts of power,” explains Rob Thurston, Cybex UK commercial director.

Where the two differ is what makes SPARC so unique; SPARC is self-powered, aligning itself closer to fan-based rowers and bikes than treadmills and traditional cross trainers. And it’s this feature, combined with everything else that makes SPARC so revolutionary, that has led Cybex to launch a product that supports one of the industry’s current biggest trends; high intensity training.

The HIT trend
High intensity training is by no means a new phenomenon; it rose to significance following Roger Bannister’s sub four-minute mile success, as he was credited with using HIT training as his preferred and consistent training method. HIT further gained popularity and standing, when, in the 1970s, middle-distance runner Sebastian Coe trained via this method. Then in the 1990s, Izumi Tabata’s research evidenced that using HIT protocols generated greater aerobic gains than steady state aerobic training. Interest, and application, of many different protocols have now been adopted throughout the fitness industry utilising a mix of machines, body weight and variety of small equipment.

High intensity interval training (HIIT) remains the most popular training method; so much so that it was named as #2 in The American College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM) Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2015.

“The concept of HIT has grown in popularity over recent years; it’s widely accessible with a vast and ever-increasing number of training protocols and can be used by anyone at any age provided appropriate equipment and methods of monitoring intensity are used,” explains Julia Dalgleish, Cybex UK master trainer.

“There’s extensive research that proves the health benefits of HIT and it’s fast becoming the training method of choice for time-poor gym goers.

“Members are also wising up to the fact that they don’t necessarily need to spend hours in the gym to reach their goals; if they train smarter and with focus, they can often achieve greater results in a shorter time.”

This booming trend is now starting to impact on how operators and gym owners are designing their facilities: “There is very much still a place for a traditional cardio setup in gyms but more recently, we’re seeing an increasing number of facilities creating a space dedicated to circuits and high intensity training for both individual users and for small group classes,” adds Thurston.

SPARC & HIT
SPARC has been designed to meet the soaring popularity of HIT; it offers Cybex’s quickest, safest and most effective cardio experience and its small footprint, ease of use and ‘Touch and Train’ console means it’s ideally suited for use in training zones and group classes.

“By minimising perceived exertion, SPARC encourages harder work; it differentiates itself from other resisted cardio pieces such as ellipticals with its sprint-like mechanics with exceptional biomechanics,” adds Dalgleish.

It’s ‘get on and go’ design means not only can it be incorporated in a traditional cardio area but integrated as part of a functional training zone; combining SPARC with kettlebells, medicine balls, plyo boxes, battle ropes and suspension trainers to create a workout space which challenges even the most devoted gym goer.

Operator benefits
By introducing SPARC, gyms are able to expand their service offering to not only keep their existing members engaged but to also attract new members who are seeking something different from a training facility.

Its biomechanically correct design and straightforward programme features means that it can be incorporated into a workout for almost all gym users; regardless of training ability or goal.

As the SPARC uses a fan as its primary method of resistance and is self-powered it doesn’t require a mains supply; this gives clubs maximum versatility in where it can be used and also permits it to be manufactured and, consequently, sold at a lower price point than most traditional cardio equipment.

“The SPARC Trainer offers health and fitness clubs something that no other fitness equipment manufacturer can,” concludes Thurston.

“Its evolution from the Arc Trainer proves its effectiveness as a tool for training not only for cardio and weight loss, but also strength, power and endurance, and its flexibility and versatility will provide operators with the opportunity to transform group exercise and functional training zones.”

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
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features

Promotional feature: Cybex

High intensity training evolved

Published in Health Club Management 2015 issue 9

Cross trainers are a staple feature in every gym’s cardio section; but ever since the launch of the Arc Trainer, premium fitness equipment supplier Cybex has been offering a unique training option for the fitness industry.

And now there’s something new; launching in the UK this September, the SPARC Trainer combines the innovative features of the Arc Trainer with fan-based resistance providing immediate resistance with no power requirements. The intuitive ‘get on and go’ design invites users to simply choose their incline while their speed determines their intensity to deliver the most powerful and effective resisted cardio workout users will get from any cross trainer.

Based on the best
Modelled on Cybex’s Arc Trainer, SPARC incorporates the design features that makes the Arc so iconic; its unique patented Reverse Arc Motion places less stress on the user’s knees and is scientifically proven to be gentler on joints, explains Dr. Paul Juris, executive director of the Cybex Research Institute: “Unlike other cross trainers, the Arc pattern of motion allows the hip and knee to move synchronously while the foot stays under the knee - so when the user pushes down and back, the opposite footplate is already up and in position, severely reducing the load and stress levels placed on key joints.”

Its activation of the glutes, quads and hamstrings – as a direct consequent of the biomechanical design of the Arc Motion – means users can work at a higher intensity, resulting in a higher level of calorie burn.

Also integral to the design of SPARC – and another feature that has been adopted from the Arc Trainer - is its ability to provide a multi-faceted workout: “SPARC doesn’t just train for cardio and weight loss; users can really boost metabolism, build muscle and gain power by moving faster against the fan resistance to generate over 1200 watts of power,” explains Rob Thurston, Cybex UK commercial director.

Where the two differ is what makes SPARC so unique; SPARC is self-powered, aligning itself closer to fan-based rowers and bikes than treadmills and traditional cross trainers. And it’s this feature, combined with everything else that makes SPARC so revolutionary, that has led Cybex to launch a product that supports one of the industry’s current biggest trends; high intensity training.

The HIT trend
High intensity training is by no means a new phenomenon; it rose to significance following Roger Bannister’s sub four-minute mile success, as he was credited with using HIT training as his preferred and consistent training method. HIT further gained popularity and standing, when, in the 1970s, middle-distance runner Sebastian Coe trained via this method. Then in the 1990s, Izumi Tabata’s research evidenced that using HIT protocols generated greater aerobic gains than steady state aerobic training. Interest, and application, of many different protocols have now been adopted throughout the fitness industry utilising a mix of machines, body weight and variety of small equipment.

High intensity interval training (HIIT) remains the most popular training method; so much so that it was named as #2 in The American College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM) Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2015.

“The concept of HIT has grown in popularity over recent years; it’s widely accessible with a vast and ever-increasing number of training protocols and can be used by anyone at any age provided appropriate equipment and methods of monitoring intensity are used,” explains Julia Dalgleish, Cybex UK master trainer.

“There’s extensive research that proves the health benefits of HIT and it’s fast becoming the training method of choice for time-poor gym goers.

“Members are also wising up to the fact that they don’t necessarily need to spend hours in the gym to reach their goals; if they train smarter and with focus, they can often achieve greater results in a shorter time.”

This booming trend is now starting to impact on how operators and gym owners are designing their facilities: “There is very much still a place for a traditional cardio setup in gyms but more recently, we’re seeing an increasing number of facilities creating a space dedicated to circuits and high intensity training for both individual users and for small group classes,” adds Thurston.

SPARC & HIT
SPARC has been designed to meet the soaring popularity of HIT; it offers Cybex’s quickest, safest and most effective cardio experience and its small footprint, ease of use and ‘Touch and Train’ console means it’s ideally suited for use in training zones and group classes.

“By minimising perceived exertion, SPARC encourages harder work; it differentiates itself from other resisted cardio pieces such as ellipticals with its sprint-like mechanics with exceptional biomechanics,” adds Dalgleish.

It’s ‘get on and go’ design means not only can it be incorporated in a traditional cardio area but integrated as part of a functional training zone; combining SPARC with kettlebells, medicine balls, plyo boxes, battle ropes and suspension trainers to create a workout space which challenges even the most devoted gym goer.

Operator benefits
By introducing SPARC, gyms are able to expand their service offering to not only keep their existing members engaged but to also attract new members who are seeking something different from a training facility.

Its biomechanically correct design and straightforward programme features means that it can be incorporated into a workout for almost all gym users; regardless of training ability or goal.

As the SPARC uses a fan as its primary method of resistance and is self-powered it doesn’t require a mains supply; this gives clubs maximum versatility in where it can be used and also permits it to be manufactured and, consequently, sold at a lower price point than most traditional cardio equipment.

“The SPARC Trainer offers health and fitness clubs something that no other fitness equipment manufacturer can,” concludes Thurston.

“Its evolution from the Arc Trainer proves its effectiveness as a tool for training not only for cardio and weight loss, but also strength, power and endurance, and its flexibility and versatility will provide operators with the opportunity to transform group exercise and functional training zones.”

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features
Editor's letter

Into the fitaverse

Fitness is already among the top three markets in the metaverse, with new technology and partnerships driving real growth and consumer engagement that looks likely to spill over into health clubs, gyms and studios
Fit Tech people

Ali Jawad

Paralympic powerlifter and founder, Accessercise
Users can easily identify which facilities in the UK are accessible to the disabled community
Fit Tech people

Hannes Sjöblad

MD, DSruptive
We want to give our users an implantable tool that allows them to collect their health data at any time and in any setting
Fit Tech people

Jamie Buck

Co-founder, Active in Time
We created a solution called AiT Voice, which turns digital data into a spoken audio timetable that connects to phone systems
Profile

Fahad Alhagbani: reinventing fitness

The team is young and ambitious, and the awareness of technology is very high. We share trends and out-of-the-box ideas almost every day
Opinion

Building on the blockchain

For small sports teams looking to compete with giants, blockchain can be a secret weapon explains Lars Rensing, CEO of Protokol
Innovation

Bold move

We ended up raising US$7m in venture capital from incredible investors, including Andreessen Horowitz, Khosla Ventures, Primetime Partners, and GingerBread Capital
App analysis

Check your form

Sency’s motion analysis technology is allowing users to check their technique as they exercise. Co-founder and CEO Gal Rotman explains how
Profile

New reality

Sam Cole, CEO of FitXR, talks to Fit Tech about taking digital workouts to the next level, with an immersive, virtual reality fitness club
Profile

Sohail Rashid

35 million people a week participate in strength training. We want Brawn to help this audience achieve their goals
Ageing

Reverse Ageing

Many apps help people track their health, but Humanity founders Peter Ward and Michael Geer have put the focus on ageing, to help users to see the direct repercussions of their habits. They talk to Steph Eaves
App analysis

Going hybrid

Workout Anytime created its app in partnership with Virtuagym. Workout Anytime’s Greg Maurer and Virtuagym’s Hugo Braam explain the process behind its creation
Research

Physical activity monitors boost activity levels

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have conducted a meta analysis of all relevant research and found that the body of evidence shows an impact
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
Fit Tech People

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
Fit Tech People

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
Fit Tech People

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
Fit Tech People

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
More features