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The Retention Guru
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HCM People: Rachael Blumberg

Platefit: creator and founder

People know yoga, Pilates, HIIT and Barry’s Bootcamp, but many don’t know vibration training and it’s my intention, passion and purpose to make it available and bring it to the world

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 10

What’s the concept?
Platefit is a premium vibration wellness brand, based in Los Angeles. We offer a wide range of 27-minute workouts centered around Power Plate machines, a medical grade device which uses harmonic vibration. The plates are always moving in three directions – left to right, front to back and up and down - which activate muscles, making them contract 30 to 40 times per second.

We use the science of vibration to wake up cells, increase circulation, drain and detoxify the lymphatic system, reduce inflammation and accelerate recovery time. The body’s response to vibration increases serotonin and HGH and reduces cortisol.

How did you come up with the idea?
Fourteen years ago, when I was 26 years old, I went to the gym with a friend and saw a vibrating platform in the corner. I asked the fitness instructor what it was, and they didn’t really know how to use it, or show any interest. I had a go for 30 seconds, which changed my life! Intuitively I knew it was amazing and great for the body and I wanted to know more.

That night I went home and started my research, finding out that pro-athletes were using vibration technology, as well as doctors, chiropractors and a range of other health professionals for different applications, including to help fine motor skills and treat Parkinsons. It’s great for increasing power, as well as circulation, range of motion and stretching.

After six sessions I saw a huge difference in my body: I felt leaner, tighter and stronger. I was sold. Shortly afterwards, I quit my job to open a studio. I had the vision of hundreds of studios and making vibration technology available for everybody. I quickly realised that a lot of people didn’t know what it was, so it became another passion project of mine to educate people on its benefits and bring it to the masses.

How did you bring the idea to fruition?
Shortly after quitting my job, I started training Cher on her Power Plate and we decided to open a studio together. Four months in, she decided it wasn’t for her and we closed the studio, but she let me lease the machines really cheaply.

I struck out on my own and found a 200sq ft studio in West Hollywood with very cheap rent, and room for five plates. I painted it myself and brought in a boombox. There was a really affluent school opposite and I started marketing myself there and grew my customer base via word of mouth among the moms.

How has it grown since then?
I met my husband four years ago and got pregnant really quickly and at that point we made the decision for me to teach less and build and expand the brand. He believed my concept was much bigger than ‘the corner of a gym.’ Platefit was born was from that point.

We invested some money in creating a cool brand, formalised a seven day training course, found some instructors and launched the second studio in Brentwood. This was followed a year later by Studio City. We will launch Sycamore in October and are looking to expand by three or four more studios in the next year. Each studio is slightly larger than the last; the upcoming studio is 1,200sq ft and will have 15 Plates.

We have plans to grow across the US and globally. People know yoga, Pilates, HIIT and Barry’s Bootcamp, but many don’t know vibration training and it’s my intention, passion and purpose to make it available and bring it to the world. At the moment we are growing the chain ourselves, but further down the line we may look for financial backing, or franchise the concept.

Who are your customers?
In the early morning we get the young working men and women, and these are followed later on by moms. We also get high school athletes who are competing in sports and want to get stronger, as well as older people. We recommend that people come three or four times a week to get the best results.

How much do you charge?
It is $27 for one class, but we also have packages and memberships and we’re on ClassPass.

Is LA a difficult market to launch health and fitness concepts?
It’s probably the most competitive market in the world for health and fitness, but there are also lots of people who are willing to try new concepts. I think that if Platefit can survive and thrive here then it could work anywhere.
There are some copycat concepts, who have come to our classes and replicated what we do and launched in other places, so they’re doing our research for us.

Class rundown

• AbFIT: focused on building core through exercises and props.

• BarreFIT: Blends elements of Pilates, dance, ballet and barre workouts, with additional emphasis on the core.

• BootcampFIT: High intensity, full body workout.

• Barre/DanceFIT: Involves easy-to-follow dance moves with plyometrics, weights, sculpting and toning exercises.

• Deep Stretch/CelluliteFIT: uses low therapeutic vibrations to enhance a deep stretch, ending with relaxation and a deep tissue massage.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
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HCM People: Rachael Blumberg

Platefit: creator and founder

People know yoga, Pilates, HIIT and Barry’s Bootcamp, but many don’t know vibration training and it’s my intention, passion and purpose to make it available and bring it to the world

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 10

What’s the concept?
Platefit is a premium vibration wellness brand, based in Los Angeles. We offer a wide range of 27-minute workouts centered around Power Plate machines, a medical grade device which uses harmonic vibration. The plates are always moving in three directions – left to right, front to back and up and down - which activate muscles, making them contract 30 to 40 times per second.

We use the science of vibration to wake up cells, increase circulation, drain and detoxify the lymphatic system, reduce inflammation and accelerate recovery time. The body’s response to vibration increases serotonin and HGH and reduces cortisol.

How did you come up with the idea?
Fourteen years ago, when I was 26 years old, I went to the gym with a friend and saw a vibrating platform in the corner. I asked the fitness instructor what it was, and they didn’t really know how to use it, or show any interest. I had a go for 30 seconds, which changed my life! Intuitively I knew it was amazing and great for the body and I wanted to know more.

That night I went home and started my research, finding out that pro-athletes were using vibration technology, as well as doctors, chiropractors and a range of other health professionals for different applications, including to help fine motor skills and treat Parkinsons. It’s great for increasing power, as well as circulation, range of motion and stretching.

After six sessions I saw a huge difference in my body: I felt leaner, tighter and stronger. I was sold. Shortly afterwards, I quit my job to open a studio. I had the vision of hundreds of studios and making vibration technology available for everybody. I quickly realised that a lot of people didn’t know what it was, so it became another passion project of mine to educate people on its benefits and bring it to the masses.

How did you bring the idea to fruition?
Shortly after quitting my job, I started training Cher on her Power Plate and we decided to open a studio together. Four months in, she decided it wasn’t for her and we closed the studio, but she let me lease the machines really cheaply.

I struck out on my own and found a 200sq ft studio in West Hollywood with very cheap rent, and room for five plates. I painted it myself and brought in a boombox. There was a really affluent school opposite and I started marketing myself there and grew my customer base via word of mouth among the moms.

How has it grown since then?
I met my husband four years ago and got pregnant really quickly and at that point we made the decision for me to teach less and build and expand the brand. He believed my concept was much bigger than ‘the corner of a gym.’ Platefit was born was from that point.

We invested some money in creating a cool brand, formalised a seven day training course, found some instructors and launched the second studio in Brentwood. This was followed a year later by Studio City. We will launch Sycamore in October and are looking to expand by three or four more studios in the next year. Each studio is slightly larger than the last; the upcoming studio is 1,200sq ft and will have 15 Plates.

We have plans to grow across the US and globally. People know yoga, Pilates, HIIT and Barry’s Bootcamp, but many don’t know vibration training and it’s my intention, passion and purpose to make it available and bring it to the world. At the moment we are growing the chain ourselves, but further down the line we may look for financial backing, or franchise the concept.

Who are your customers?
In the early morning we get the young working men and women, and these are followed later on by moms. We also get high school athletes who are competing in sports and want to get stronger, as well as older people. We recommend that people come three or four times a week to get the best results.

How much do you charge?
It is $27 for one class, but we also have packages and memberships and we’re on ClassPass.

Is LA a difficult market to launch health and fitness concepts?
It’s probably the most competitive market in the world for health and fitness, but there are also lots of people who are willing to try new concepts. I think that if Platefit can survive and thrive here then it could work anywhere.
There are some copycat concepts, who have come to our classes and replicated what we do and launched in other places, so they’re doing our research for us.

Class rundown

• AbFIT: focused on building core through exercises and props.

• BarreFIT: Blends elements of Pilates, dance, ballet and barre workouts, with additional emphasis on the core.

• BootcampFIT: High intensity, full body workout.

• Barre/DanceFIT: Involves easy-to-follow dance moves with plyometrics, weights, sculpting and toning exercises.

• Deep Stretch/CelluliteFIT: uses low therapeutic vibrations to enhance a deep stretch, ending with relaxation and a deep tissue massage.

Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features

Create your own energy

A breakthrough in technology means wearable devices and other health and fitness products could soon be self-powered. Steph Eaves talks to Dr Ishara Dharmasena to find out how this could impact health and fitness
interview

Paul Bowman, Wexer

The future of fitness is hybrid, says the CEO of Wexer. He shares his thoughts on why and how the industry should embrace this change
interview

Daniel Sobhani, Freeletics

People are set up for failure by the fitness industry with false promises and unrealistic expectations. We’ve always wanted to put a stop to this, and with Mindset Coaching we’re taking the next step
people

Richard Hanbury

Founder and CEO, Sana
I was in Yemen, close to the capital, Sana’a, when I had the accident that put me in a wheelchair and gave me a chronic nerve damage pain problem. This led me to develop the underlying technology of Sana

Functional wearables

A new ultra-thin, stretchable electronic material could be a game changer for wearable tech
interview

Lindsay Cook, FitOn

Not everyone can afford an expensive piece of fitness equipment or a personal trainer, but everyone has a smartphone
interview

Sharon Hegarty, Samsung

We envisage a world where someone’s smart home can support their fitness regime
Editor's letter

Monetising digital

Having made a lightening fast pivot to digital during lockdown, gym operators are now figuring out how to optimise the assets they’ve invested in – it’s time to monetise digital and find ways to create hybrid models
people

Patrick Lucey

VP of AI, Stats Perform
We can capture tracking data from historical videos, enabling us to do large scale comparisons of players, such as Michael Jordan, across eras
people

Ian Mullane

Founder, Keepme
Using predictive and machine learning models, operators can hyper-personalise engagement

Fighting COVID-19

In the aftermath of the pandemic, people will be more aware of the importance of their health and the strength of their immune system. Can fit tech alert users to potential immunodeficiencies or symptoms? And might these products assist governments? We asked industry leaders for their predictions
interview

Digital ecosystem

The digitisation of the sector was going to happen anyway. COVID-19 has simply accelerated the digital transformation
The Retention Guru
The Retention Guru