The Leisure Media Company Ltd | Fit Tech promotion
The Leisure Media Company Ltd | Fit Tech promotion
The Leisure Media Company Ltd | Fit Tech promotion
features

Insight: Rene Moos

The CEO of Basic-Fit shared insights into the workings of the company at the Virtuagym FitNation conference in Amsterdam. Megan Whitby was there for HCM

Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 3

Founded in the Netherlands, budget operator Basic-Fit has more than 750 locations across the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Luxembourg and Spain.

The brand has cited ambitions to increase its European club network to reach the 1,250 club mark in 2022.

CEO Rene Moos was a professional tennis player in the 1980s, but didn’t reach the top, so became a tennis coach.

He opened his own tennis school which grew into a complex with 24 courts and fitness facilities, before launching the first Total Health Club in Hoofddorp in the Netherlands, however, Moos told delegates at the FitNation conference the club wasn’t much more successful than his tennis career had been.

Eventually, he found success, along with his business partner, Eric Wilborts, in the budget fitness market. “I failed as a tennis player, but succeeded as a businessman,” he told delegates.

About Basic-Fit
Having witnessed the success of Planet Fitness in using a low-cost approach, he was inspired to follow the same route in building his own business.

“Our brand operates with a low-cost model because, although investment is low, the return is high,” Moos said.

The brand recently launched in France and despite concerns it would be a challenging market to enter, Moos described the move as “fairly easy”.

“You have to focus your efforts and resources to succeed,” he said. “Better a market leader in a few countries than number three or four in many countries.

“Time to market is important and you can always improve with feedback,” said Moos. “Better done than perfect!”

In depth insights
Moos gave an in-depth presentation into Basic-Fit’s operating structure. He explained how the brand’s gyms are remotely managed by centralised teams using smart cameras and intercom systems, because the brand has so few staff at clubs and wants to support them.

This method was initially tested and fine-tuned in three locations and then rolled out across the estate.

Basic-Fit has developed its own remote surveillance tool and control-room to observe in-club activity using live-feeds that are monitored by sound and vision by an external, off-site team.

This allows the club to control access to clubs as well as keeping tabs on security and tracking members’ welfare.

To illustrate how this works in practice, Moos explained that – using specialist software – Basic-Fit’s surveillance system also monitors levels of aggression in clubs.

If raised voices or certain verbal intonations that signal aggression are detected, the system alerts Basic-Fit’s remote control-operators, allowing them to intervene if necessary, by sending someone to site.

Data driven
“We have one staff member per gym and about 20 to 25 smart cameras,” Moos explained. “These cameras are monitored 24/7 in our own control room and everything is data-driven, from opening the doors to operating the assistance intercom.

“But of course, this kind of system is not something you can set up easily and it also involves trial and error,” he said. “These smart cameras detect, among other things, whether someone has been lying still for more than three minutes, so we can tell if someone has become ill. However, you can guess what happened when Basic-Fit introduced yoga classes… the control room went crazy!”

Future tech
During his keynote, Moos made predictions about the future relationship between the fitness industry and technology, saying: “The fitness world will see VR really take off in a couple of years, and I believe that we’ll soon see Apple and Google enter this industry.

“If this happens, gym operators simply won’t have the budgets to be able to compete against such major brands”.

Megan Whitby, reporting from the Virtuagym FitNation conference in the Netherlands, for HCM

Read our interview with Tom Moos, son of Rene, in the February issue of HCM magazine

Top tips from Rene Moos

Better done than perfect
Release your product and improve it based on feedback

Focus your energies
It’s better to be the number one in one market than number three or four in many

Make mistakes
Don’t just think, but do. Try new things

Create a strong, loyal team
They will underpin your business success

Cluster
If you want to set up additional gyms, do so in places you’re already known

Keep innovating
Your competitor is no longer just another gym. Big tech is coming

Rene Moos, photographed at the first Virtuagym FitNation conference in Amsterdam
Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features
Editor's letter

Into the fitaverse

Fitness is already among the top three markets in the metaverse, with new technology and partnerships driving real growth and consumer engagement that looks likely to spill over into health clubs, gyms and studios
Fit Tech people

Ali Jawad

Paralympic powerlifter and founder, Accessercise
Users can easily identify which facilities in the UK are accessible to the disabled community
Fit Tech people

Hannes Sjöblad

MD, DSruptive
We want to give our users an implantable tool that allows them to collect their health data at any time and in any setting
Fit Tech people

Jamie Buck

Co-founder, Active in Time
We created a solution called AiT Voice, which turns digital data into a spoken audio timetable that connects to phone systems
Profile

Fahad Alhagbani: reinventing fitness

The team is young and ambitious, and the awareness of technology is very high. We share trends and out-of-the-box ideas almost every day
Opinion

Building on the blockchain

For small sports teams looking to compete with giants, blockchain can be a secret weapon explains Lars Rensing, CEO of Protokol
Innovation

Bold move

We ended up raising US$7m in venture capital from incredible investors, including Andreessen Horowitz, Khosla Ventures, Primetime Partners, and GingerBread Capital
App analysis

Check your form

Sency’s motion analysis technology is allowing users to check their technique as they exercise. Co-founder and CEO Gal Rotman explains how
Profile

New reality

Sam Cole, CEO of FitXR, talks to Fit Tech about taking digital workouts to the next level, with an immersive, virtual reality fitness club
Profile

Sohail Rashid

35 million people a week participate in strength training. We want Brawn to help this audience achieve their goals
Ageing

Reverse Ageing

Many apps help people track their health, but Humanity founders Peter Ward and Michael Geer have put the focus on ageing, to help users to see the direct repercussions of their habits. They talk to Steph Eaves
App analysis

Going hybrid

Workout Anytime created its app in partnership with Virtuagym. Workout Anytime’s Greg Maurer and Virtuagym’s Hugo Braam explain the process behind its creation
Research

Physical activity monitors boost activity levels

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have conducted a meta analysis of all relevant research and found that the body of evidence shows an impact
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
Fit Tech People

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
Fit Tech People

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
Fit Tech People

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
Fit Tech People

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
More features
Study Active is a UK leading provider of health & fitness qualifications including Gym Instructing ...
InBody provides products that are accurate, medically rated holding a CE mark and certified to ...
Lockers
Cryotherapy
Salt therapy products
Digital
Flooring
08-10 Oct 2024
Malaga - FYCMA, Malaga, Spain
Study Active is a UK leading provider of health & fitness qualifications including Gym Instructing ...
InBody provides products that are accurate, medically rated holding a CE mark and certified to ...
Get Fit Tech
Sign up for the free Fit Tech ezine and breaking news alerts
Sign up
Lockers
Cryotherapy
Salt therapy products
Digital
Flooring
08-10 Oct 2024
Malaga - FYCMA, Malaga, Spain

latest fit tech news

Apple has previewed the upcoming watchOS 11, which has more health and fitness insights and offers more personalisation than ever ...
news • 12 Jun 2024
Noraxon’s next-generation motion capture system, MyoMotion, can be used by PTs to enable custom training programmes, minimise injuries and help ...
news • 11 Jun 2024
New research shows that following social media health influencers motivates young people to exercise more vigorously and eat more fruit ...
news • 28 May 2024
Peloton has secured a critical US$1bn five-year loan to shore up its finances. The loan has repayment terms which are ...
news • 24 May 2024
Peloton Interactive Inc is believed to be working to get its costs under control in a bid to align with ...
news • 08 May 2024
HoloBike, a holographic training bike that simulates trail rides in lifelike 3D, is aiming to push indoor cycling technology up ...
news • 08 May 2024
Xplor Technologies has unveiled a financing solution for small businesses, which aims to counter the traditional lending process and help ...
news • 08 May 2024
Moonbird is a tactile breathing coach, which provides real-time biofeedback, measuring heart rate and heart rate variability. Studies show it ...
news • 02 May 2024
Atlanta-based boutique fitness software company, Xplor Mariana Tek, has kicked off a push for international expansion. Shannon Tracey, VP of ...
news • 18 Apr 2024
Portugese footballer, Cristiano Ronaldo, has launched a health and wellness app that harmonises advice on fitness, nutrition and mental wellness ...
news • 05 Apr 2024
More fit tech news
features

Insight: Rene Moos

The CEO of Basic-Fit shared insights into the workings of the company at the Virtuagym FitNation conference in Amsterdam. Megan Whitby was there for HCM

Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 3

Founded in the Netherlands, budget operator Basic-Fit has more than 750 locations across the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Luxembourg and Spain.

The brand has cited ambitions to increase its European club network to reach the 1,250 club mark in 2022.

CEO Rene Moos was a professional tennis player in the 1980s, but didn’t reach the top, so became a tennis coach.

He opened his own tennis school which grew into a complex with 24 courts and fitness facilities, before launching the first Total Health Club in Hoofddorp in the Netherlands, however, Moos told delegates at the FitNation conference the club wasn’t much more successful than his tennis career had been.

Eventually, he found success, along with his business partner, Eric Wilborts, in the budget fitness market. “I failed as a tennis player, but succeeded as a businessman,” he told delegates.

About Basic-Fit
Having witnessed the success of Planet Fitness in using a low-cost approach, he was inspired to follow the same route in building his own business.

“Our brand operates with a low-cost model because, although investment is low, the return is high,” Moos said.

The brand recently launched in France and despite concerns it would be a challenging market to enter, Moos described the move as “fairly easy”.

“You have to focus your efforts and resources to succeed,” he said. “Better a market leader in a few countries than number three or four in many countries.

“Time to market is important and you can always improve with feedback,” said Moos. “Better done than perfect!”

In depth insights
Moos gave an in-depth presentation into Basic-Fit’s operating structure. He explained how the brand’s gyms are remotely managed by centralised teams using smart cameras and intercom systems, because the brand has so few staff at clubs and wants to support them.

This method was initially tested and fine-tuned in three locations and then rolled out across the estate.

Basic-Fit has developed its own remote surveillance tool and control-room to observe in-club activity using live-feeds that are monitored by sound and vision by an external, off-site team.

This allows the club to control access to clubs as well as keeping tabs on security and tracking members’ welfare.

To illustrate how this works in practice, Moos explained that – using specialist software – Basic-Fit’s surveillance system also monitors levels of aggression in clubs.

If raised voices or certain verbal intonations that signal aggression are detected, the system alerts Basic-Fit’s remote control-operators, allowing them to intervene if necessary, by sending someone to site.

Data driven
“We have one staff member per gym and about 20 to 25 smart cameras,” Moos explained. “These cameras are monitored 24/7 in our own control room and everything is data-driven, from opening the doors to operating the assistance intercom.

“But of course, this kind of system is not something you can set up easily and it also involves trial and error,” he said. “These smart cameras detect, among other things, whether someone has been lying still for more than three minutes, so we can tell if someone has become ill. However, you can guess what happened when Basic-Fit introduced yoga classes… the control room went crazy!”

Future tech
During his keynote, Moos made predictions about the future relationship between the fitness industry and technology, saying: “The fitness world will see VR really take off in a couple of years, and I believe that we’ll soon see Apple and Google enter this industry.

“If this happens, gym operators simply won’t have the budgets to be able to compete against such major brands”.

Megan Whitby, reporting from the Virtuagym FitNation conference in the Netherlands, for HCM

Read our interview with Tom Moos, son of Rene, in the February issue of HCM magazine

Top tips from Rene Moos

Better done than perfect
Release your product and improve it based on feedback

Focus your energies
It’s better to be the number one in one market than number three or four in many

Make mistakes
Don’t just think, but do. Try new things

Create a strong, loyal team
They will underpin your business success

Cluster
If you want to set up additional gyms, do so in places you’re already known

Keep innovating
Your competitor is no longer just another gym. Big tech is coming

Rene Moos, photographed at the first Virtuagym FitNation conference in Amsterdam
Sign up here to get Fit Tech's weekly ezine and every issue of Fit Tech magazine free on digital.
Gallery
More features
Editor's letter

Into the fitaverse

Fitness is already among the top three markets in the metaverse, with new technology and partnerships driving real growth and consumer engagement that looks likely to spill over into health clubs, gyms and studios
Fit Tech people

Ali Jawad

Paralympic powerlifter and founder, Accessercise
Users can easily identify which facilities in the UK are accessible to the disabled community
Fit Tech people

Hannes Sjöblad

MD, DSruptive
We want to give our users an implantable tool that allows them to collect their health data at any time and in any setting
Fit Tech people

Jamie Buck

Co-founder, Active in Time
We created a solution called AiT Voice, which turns digital data into a spoken audio timetable that connects to phone systems
Profile

Fahad Alhagbani: reinventing fitness

The team is young and ambitious, and the awareness of technology is very high. We share trends and out-of-the-box ideas almost every day
Opinion

Building on the blockchain

For small sports teams looking to compete with giants, blockchain can be a secret weapon explains Lars Rensing, CEO of Protokol
Innovation

Bold move

We ended up raising US$7m in venture capital from incredible investors, including Andreessen Horowitz, Khosla Ventures, Primetime Partners, and GingerBread Capital
App analysis

Check your form

Sency’s motion analysis technology is allowing users to check their technique as they exercise. Co-founder and CEO Gal Rotman explains how
Profile

New reality

Sam Cole, CEO of FitXR, talks to Fit Tech about taking digital workouts to the next level, with an immersive, virtual reality fitness club
Profile

Sohail Rashid

35 million people a week participate in strength training. We want Brawn to help this audience achieve their goals
Ageing

Reverse Ageing

Many apps help people track their health, but Humanity founders Peter Ward and Michael Geer have put the focus on ageing, to help users to see the direct repercussions of their habits. They talk to Steph Eaves
App analysis

Going hybrid

Workout Anytime created its app in partnership with Virtuagym. Workout Anytime’s Greg Maurer and Virtuagym’s Hugo Braam explain the process behind its creation
Research

Physical activity monitors boost activity levels

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have conducted a meta analysis of all relevant research and found that the body of evidence shows an impact
Editor's letter

Two-way coaching

Content providers have been hugely active in the fit tech market since the start of the pandemic. We expect the industry to move on from delivering these services on a ‘broadcast-only’ basis as two-way coaching becomes the new USP
Fit Tech People

Laurent Petit

Co-founder, Active Giving
The future of sports and fitness are dependent on the climate. Our goal is to positively influence the future of our planet by instilling a global vision of wellbeing and a sense of collective action
Fit Tech People

Adam Zeitsiff

CEO, Intelivideo
We don’t just create the technology and bail – we support our clients’ ongoing hybridisation efforts
Fit Tech People

Anantharaman Pattabiraman

CEO and co-founder, Auro
When you’re undertaking fitness activities, unless you’re on a stationary bike, in most cases it’s not safe or necessary to be tied to a screen, especially a small screen
Fit Tech People

Mike Hansen

Managing partner, Endorphinz
We noticed a big gap in the market – customers needed better insights but also recommendations on what to do, whether that be customer acquisition, content creation, marketing and more
More features